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as a public service by your television provider. >> in virginia two former governors are competing for the senate seat currently held by democrat jim webb. republican george allen and democrat tim kaine are polling within the statistical margin of error, and the cook political report rates the race as toss-up. last week the candidates met for an hourlong debate moderated by "meet the press" host david gregory. >> moderator: and good afternoon. welcome to the virginia senatorial debate between democrat tim kaine and republican george allen. i'm david gregory, moderator of "meet the press," and moderator of today's debate. i want to quickly cover the rules of today's event. the debate will last one hour, and we'll begin with two-minute opening statements from each candidate. then our panelists and i will pose questions directly to the candidate. these questions are determined by the panelists, by us. they have not been received by the candidates or reviewed by the fairfax chamber. each candidate will have one minute and 30 seconds to respond, and the candidate answering fist will hav
they do it by occupying the printing press of the local southern newspaper, the conservator in virginia for example, the editor was carefully setting the type to his newspaper one day and i think an early 1862 barges the first minnesota and this side not to undo all his work for the other three said the paper exists with one page of sort of local news and three pages of news for minnesota news and other places they actually traveled with portable printing presses there exclusively almost exclusively enlisted ideas in the world. those aren't censored either and they are not censored officially. they are also not in the sense if you are writing a letter to your mom on some things i would want to know if my son didn't have a decent meal in two weeks. well, when you are writing for other soldiers they know all that stuff and so there is no need to soften the edges a little bit, so they are especially and censored because of the amended the audience with the almost ralf voice and it's hard to imagine anything like that today. it's not like stars and stripes in world war ii which goes through
on the role of virginia in the election and a history of the african-american vote in virginia. we will also be joined by editor in chief of the washington monthly to discuss recent articles in the magazine examining the consumer financial protection bureau. live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> i watched c-span every time, especially when i really pay attention the most. any time something is going on i want to watch c-span because they typically have the best, most unbiased view of whatever is happening. if i want to get spun in a circle of watch one of the other news organizations. i love c-span. watch on tv, on line. if something's going on now want to know what's happening al west and to c-span. don't know that i have a favorite show. for me it is always just anytime i need to know what's going on i know that c-span will have the real story of what's been happening. >> jeff trick watch is c-span on direct tv, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> a new report from the center for american progress look
three states in the new south, north carolina, virginia and florida. the six days in the midwest rust belt area are much more heavily white than these other swing states. they are much more slowly changing than the states, for example, in the new south which have a much higher level of minority voters and are changing rapidly. and, of course, the states in the southwest with a minority population particularly among hispanics is shooting up very rapidly and the states have a much more higher proportion of minority voters that are favorable to barack obama. with that in mind let's look at some of the particular swing states that are in play at this point. maybe more so than any other state, ohio seems to be the fulcrum of this election, that it's a state that is very accessible to mitt romney, a state of that obama could hold him and he holds all six of the states in the rust belt midwest area combined with only four electoral states short of victory. so critical for the romney strategy to hold a state of ohio. that's not happening at this point. at this point obama is probably up to ab
] [applause] >> dr. teresa sullivan is the eighth president of the university of virginia, home of the older student-run honor system under which students pledge not to lie, cheat or steal. dr. sullivan was previously the provost and executive of private affairs. and an executive vice chancellor for academic affairs for the university of essex system. she focuses on labor force tomography, with particular emphasis on economic marginality and consumer debt. the co-author of six books and numerous scholarly articles. her most recent work explores the question of who filed for bankruptcy and why. in addition to her service to institutions of higher learning, she has also served as chair of the u.s. census advisory committee, secretary of the american sociological association, and as a fellow of the american association for the advancements of science. her lecture this morning is "how can we maintain a culture of honor and integrity?" those who cheat and those who might come up please welcome another texan to chautauqua. [applause] >> good morning to all of view. for those of you who are uva alu
in the midwest area, ohio, michigan, and ohio, states in the southwest, colorado, new mexico and nevada. virginia and florida in the south. all of the states are pretty different. the six states in the midwest are much more heavy and have a slow level of demographic change and they are more bechler changing slowly. that is favorable in showing preference for barack obama could with that in mind, let's look at some of the particular swing states that are in play. more than any other state, perhaps ohio is one of the pogroms. a state that was believed to be for mitt romney, but if obama holds all six electoral votes, he is only four electoral votes short of victory. critical romney strategy in the state of ohio. that is not happening at this point. at this point, some of the data on the bottom, you see that the were served with the white working class and he lost by 10 points in 2008. his hope was that he could expend that much a part of it. that is really what romney strategy is. romney is not anywhere close to driving up that margin. he is doing no better at all for white college graduates. that
to northern virginia etc. the could be true even if pennsylvania is overwhelmingly democratic because of the more friendly terrain under the circumstances. >> basically what's happened is when i first started coming into politics in the 80's it's always decided by the monsters of the midway. the midwest and the swing states are preponderant the whitewater demographically and heavily blue-collar. now it's emerged in the last eight years to second pathway available to the democrats and previously heavily read state devotee of the set so the same forces that obama himself and bodies, the well-educated and diverse and the kind of southeast conference north carolina, virginia and florida and southwest conference of nevada, colorado and mexico with arizona and georgia kind of beat behind each case. and in the long run, you know, is striking how obama is holding up in the western state into long run though, places like this where the democrats hold the coalition of minorities and college whites and social liberal seem to be more of the future of the party also, again, this election i think o
, florida, ohio, and virginia. excuse me, three states. did so many, wisconsin, new hampshire. those are fundamentally favorable electrodynamics. i'm going to walk through the specifics in each of these. to designate president obama won florida by a grand total of 237,000. obama one ohio by a grand total of two ordered 50,000. pennsylvania was kind of a wipeout. carried by president obama by $620,000. wisconsin, smaller state and ohio, smallest it and florida, bigger vote margin. the census was carried by 410,000 votes for president obama. new hampshire win for obama by 68,000. a smaller number, but smaller state. fewer votes to pick up. i will let for obama by 136,000 votes and colorado went for one by 130,000. i told those up because the total up to about 2 million. for mitt romney to win the presidency he has to change about 0 million mines. he has to take 2 million of those voters in change and million of their minds. actually ferlies do. a very small number. do you realize that the campaign will spend approximately $2 billion on each side, more than $2,000 per vote will be spent
? >> not according to your rules. i like more than less, but going on. >> governor allen, virginia voters are divided on whether they want the affordable care act to stay or go because it's not completely ruled out and because it's so complex. do you want to completely get rid of the law as a stands and start over on health care reform from strach or favor -- scratch or favor another method? >> i'll use the first part to rebut comments tim made. tim talked about $16,000 of debt. now it's the spending in washington has gone up to $54,000 per second in spending. tim contribute sideses tax -- criticizes tax cuts past, but they created 7 million jobs after the devastating attacks on this country in 9/11. the ideas of who is fiscally responsible and who creates the most jobs k i think our approach will clearly improve job opportunities. on the health care tax law. that's also an impediment to jobs. i heard from so many small business owners, community hospitals that this is so harmful to them. small businesses don't want to get over 50 employees. some make their employees part time, making it tougher for
,000 in virginia, just shaving off 100,000 votes in the states could turn this election. secondly, when you look at congressman john lewis that pay the price for us to vote, you think that donna is right, we need to have a two-pronged strategy. we have got to fight for the law and we need to do everything we need to do to vote this year so where we can't turn them around like ohio and pennsylvania and michigan and reverend charles williams and others in michigan, we can still vote because if they could take no right to vote instead of against jim clark and get eaten like like john john ls san jose williams, then what excuse do we have if we can't get a couple of i.d.s and go to the pole? we cannot be that lazy that we cannot do what we have to do this november so as much as we are outraged about it, we need to have a strategy that we are there for going to be proactive in deal with it. lastly i'm glad you've said this because i'm with the conservatives. i'm a conservative. i'm trying to conserve the voting rights act. i'm trying to conserve the civil rights act. those that are trying to have a r
that are in columbus between here and cincinnati that were counties that were called the virginia military district. after the revolutionary war the officers and revolutionary army were given land in ohio the was part of the west of course in that time. they moved out here carry in their culture in the background of the company's light voting stake they didn't bring slaves with them. in ohio. but they were sympathetic to that culture. part of ohio also has been settled from west virginia, kentucky, tennessee. both states to the south of the appellation states and there's a part of ohio that is up alisa and southeastern ohio so there were southern sympathies. there's a lot of activity during the civil war and the there's the pro conservative activity and no chaim. the governor of ohio declared martial law. the and to the picture after the civil rights war where the politicians were going to be successful statewide. the southern sympathies and people with number sympathies. the grand army of the public which was the union army took many of its union officers from ally of. the established the republic
that are called the virginia military district. after the revolutionary war officers in the revolutionary army did not get paid but were given land and ohio. part of the west at that time. they moved out here. this sort of carried with them their culture and their background. they came from a slave owning state. it did not bring slaves with them. they were sympathetic to that culture. part of ohio also has been settled from west virginia, kentucky, tennessee, the states and the self, appellation, and indeed there is a part of a high of the really is appellation. again, there were seven separate piece. there was a lot of activity during the civil war 1/5. the governor of ohio at one point declared martial law and no higher to try to rein in the confederate sympathies and sympathizers who were here. so all of that adds up to the picture after the civil war where politicians are going to be successful statewide in ohio they had to appeal to both people with seven sympathies and people with north sympathies. on the northern side of the grand army of the republic to a committee of its officers from ohi
that are called the virginia military district. after the revolutionary war, officers in the revolutionary army who didn't get paid were given land in ohio. ohio's a part of the west, of course, at that time. they moved out here. they sort of carried with them their culture and their background. they came from a slave-owning state. they didn't bring slaves with them into ohio, but they were sympathetic to that culture. part of ohio also has been settled from west virginia, kentucky, tennessee. those states just to the south of us, appalachian states and, indeed, there's a part of ohio that really is ap lay a cha -- appalachia, and that's southeastern ohio. there were southern sympathies there. there was a lot of activity during the civil war that was pro-confederate activity in ohio. the governor of ohio at one point declared martial law in ohio to try to rein in the confederate sympathies and sympathizers who were here. so all of that adds up to a picture after the civil war where if politicians were going to be successful statewide in ohio, they had to appeal to both people with southern symp
did not on private property in the middle of virginia -- i did that on private property in the middle of virginia and the stuff that happened there that was quite disturbing, for me. should i -- why don't i read. sure, of course. by the end of the book, to end your question again, one of the things i learned was civic pride, having tried in the place i live. -- having pride in the place of the. along the way reenactors as they do think you'll become a reenactor? is this something you stick with? and so i didn't really think that it would. i was fascinated by the hobby and had a great time doing it. crazy adventure but i didn't really think that i would continue it. but a sword asked myself the question like well, what would i do. what they do if i was a reenactor? what with the choices i would make? in some regards this is my chance to editorialize but i hope this last chapter sort of reveals not only my sense of humor, but also my civic pride. and i wanted to do something about the place where i live. that's so difficult in los angeles because the history isn't that long, and it's no
. william perry harris then was a soldier here in ohio born in virginia. all three states claimed him but he was successful because he could adapt to the midwest. going into the 20th century with william howard taft, president of the united states, as cincinnati was a southern town and trade was with the south and home of the underground railroad. they can get at of kentucky and were safe and could be disbursed partying was from marion ohio, william mckinley elected president sell a bunch of ohio wins. james garfield you have presidents who came during this period after the civil war up through the 1920's pulling presidents from other parts of the country that tend to be more moderate. not ideologues that is still true statewide. attendance the to be more pragmatic and light -- less ideological. if you try to compete in the general election in helps to swing to the middle. but ohio generally is the average state. almost every demographic group is well represented here. catholic, fundamentalist, ma instream, protestants, ethnic groups. the only one is maybe the hispanics. some places as a sig
for massachusetts and new york let's build on that and so on. the bill of rights and george mason, virginia bill of rights. abolition of slavery occurred in various states, and then out of for a lesson, so what has gone before us clacks we have a duty to the future and i think they tried the best when they actually are understanding and respect all and that is part of the national archives. if i can just on a personal note tell you why i'm here. and justice thomas's presence is no explanation. what the heck am i doing here? when i was 11-years-old i came to the national archives and i got this document that is a big version of the emancipation proclamation, iain the innovation proclamation look at the 100th anniversary of the 50 years ago september 1962 and released at special edition for the kids like me and i got my picture of abraham lincoln. [laughter] that made the not cynical. they come at a very young age to a place like this the exposed to mr. langdon been exposed to the declaration of the independent constitution and i think i'm here today honestly because of that and i would like to gi
it is not possible to achieve. if people being put on the no right to exist list. virginia permanent and secure stay and it may never have been. i think we may have to think outside of the box. >> my book has nothing to do with the settlements but i went to south sudan the president told me about the war because of the land disputes because those forces do not want to see them living next door to them. fresno palestinian against the christians living today. nothing to do with boundaries with slander occupation but the very acceptance. >> spending 20 years on the issue with the zionists with no right to exist so this intolerance any community of people they call infidels. >> i have three questions if you can hear me. [laughter] what about iran are pakistan sells there know how to terrorists so it is not the state of iran who is attacking the terrorists? but the fourth state is orthodox. aren't atomic bombs altogether anachronistic of the next war will be cyberattack? thank you. >> i will answer only two of them with your permission. you are right to. nobody can guarantee of that technology will be us
of other people's ideas. >> republican george allen debates democrat tim kaine for the open virginia senate seat. mr. ellen served as the senator from 2001 to 2007, and before that he was the governor from 1994 to 1998. he is also a former governor who served from 2006 to 2010. the bate hosted by wrc tv and the cook political report has treated this a tossup. this is about an hour hosted by the fairfax county chamber of commerce at nbc. i am david gregory the moderator of meet the press and moderator of today's debate. i want to begin by quickly covering the rules of today's event. last for one hour and begin with two minute opening statements from each candidate to read than the panelists and i will pose questions directly to the candidates. i should note they are determined by the panelists, by us. they haven't been received by the candidates were reviewed by the fairfax chamber. each candidate will have one minute and 30 seconds to respond, and the candidate the dancers first all have an additional one minute rebuttal. i like to reserve the right to follow-up with some questions as i see
. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. cantwell: i ask the indulgence of my colleague from west virginia. i appreciate his indulgence for me to make a recognition of a very important washingtonian. before i start, mr. president, i want to take a moment to say my thoughts and prayers are with the families and the victims of the horrific bombing that -- attack, i should say, that happened in libya and that it is now time to remember all of the men and women who serve our country abroad in these embassies and to thank them for their service and hope for their protection. mr. president, on a chilly day in january of 2009, americans watched with pride as barack obama stood before the nation and took the presidential oath of office. for some, that experience was another milestone in a long journey to ensure that america lives up to the ideas that this country was built for everyone. the election of an african-american president shattered a barrier that many thought would never happen. the american struggle for civil rights has produced many seminal moments. rosa parks and the montgomery bus bo
carolina, 200,008, 14,000 in virginia. saving of 100,000 votes could turn this election. secondly, when you look at the congressman, they, the price to those, i think we need to have a two-pronged strategy. we have to fight to chase a loss, all we need to do everything we need to devote this year so where we cannot turn around like ohio and pennsylvania and michigan, we can still vote because if they could take no right to vote and stand appearance and get beaten by john lewis of those they william, them what excuse to we have that we cannot give a couple of ideas and go to the polls? we cannot be that lazy. we cannot do we have to do this november. as much as we are of raised we need to have a strategy that we are there to mccourt to be proactive and deal with it. lastly and that you put me on this side is a what the conservatives. i am trying to conserve the voting rights act. i am trying to conserve -- i'm trying to conserve the civil rights act. the radicals of those that are trying to have a radical departure from what made this country great. we are trying to insert the country. other
in virginia lined up the scores of other people to have their marriage legalized. and this is happening all across the south. so many things were meaningful happening to people. and it was hard, but they seized with a coed and they moved forward. >> just to press the point a little bit more, there are business owners, property owners. and there's a college president, howard johnson. >> is that right? >> part of it is true. obviously all of what he described was true, but i think there was a lot more. i don't think that -- i didn't come away feeling worn down by the bleakness of it. i found it inspiring what people made up their lives despite everything and they did quite a lot. >> just to practice .1 step further, it struck me in reading it that by reducing the complexity because in a passage like that, and 750 word book review, it gives the impression that this is a kind of usual story, which is that it's all struggle and strike and these passing moments of brightness, but doom and gloom. >> as a person who writes about terrible things in the past, trust me well aware of how bad things get
in kentucky which was, excuse me, when kentucky was still, no, i'm sorry, in west virginia, when west virgina was still part of virginia. so it was john marshall who presided over the trial and who was not going to let thomas jefferson get away with any sloppy prosecution for treason. and in fact the burr trial became very important in american jurisprudence because under the constitution treason is very narrowly defined. it consists of waging war against the united states or, abetting those countries at war with the united states, and, it has to be witnessed by two eyewitnesss. well, the prosecution couldn't get the eyewitnesses because the stuff that burr was said to have done actually happened when burr was far away. and secondly, there was no war. and marshall ruled on this, and he instructed the jury you have to acquit. well, anyway, the rest of the story, i can't tell the rest of the story, because i want you to read the book. in fact i'm going to stop there and ask, see if you have questions and if, by the way you have any answers to the questions i have i will be happy to listen to th
from washington through virginia, the liner, we arrived in a little town and we were tight and beaten and left bloody but one of the same young men that attacked and beat me and my seatmate came to my office and should be wary of 09 and said mr. lewis, i'm one of the people that attacked. i want to apologize. please forgive me? his son was with him and he'd been encouraging his father to seek out the people that he attacked, start crying, the father started crying, they both gave me a hug and i started crying. this book speaks of reconciliation. the bill become the capacity to be reconciled to move towards the community and if you believe in something you should speak up and speak out and stand up and fight for a. you have to be consistent. you have to insist on the truth. not one thing is stronger than the truth. there may be setbacks and disappointment, but in the long scheme of things, you are going to win and succeed. the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence, the way of truth will win. this book has suggested whether it is in the middle east, and africa coming in
't a homosexuality to boddicker, it was the sexuality. >> where did you grow up? >> in norfolk virginia and virginia beach virgi
primaries involve, or the wisconsin primaries, hubert humphrey versus john f. kennedy in the west virginia primary, same two contenders, and it is almost like a stalking horse. he's kind of a stalking horse for lyndon johnson. >> what does that mean? >> and fellow who is kind of, you know, saying he is operating on his own, but really at the behest of someone else. hopefully he had wanted on his own to be president. obviously, but lyndon johnson wanted it even more. because lyndon johnson once power more than anyone ever. the lyndon johnson always wants to do it in an indirect way that is back in the cloak room sort of way, and he's going to get the nomination, that's how he go and get it. it is not enter any primaries. he enters the democrat race like a week before the convention convenes in los angeles. you know, he almost pulls back. he almost pulls it off. jack kennedy is not nominated until, what is the? until they call the roll on wyoming. >> now, there is no state that begins with z. those two primaries, jack kennedy's father doesn't want him to enter wisconsin, he thinks it is dang
at a game in four paragraphs in ohio, yesterday. literally all night. ohio yesterday, virginia today and tomorrow pennsylvania, saturday in florida. so for a battleground state. thanks for saying that before we go to calls. the things we been saying is we want these debate moderators to our respect, my colleague, mr. lehrer, ms. crowley of cnn before distinguished americans can give us the responsibility to shepherd and to heard. we want them to the poverty on the agenda. in 2008 obama mccain, the were poor or poverty did not come up on time in three debates. obama did we say, mccain didn't raise it. moderators never asked about it. fast-forward four years am at the numbers, today comes a situation where by now. we cannot abide another campaign season where the issue doesn't get discussed. i call him my colleagues never where we go with this issue. we must raise the issues starting with jim lehrer and the first debate october 3rd. >> host: tavis smiley, cornell west, deborah is in cincinnati ohio. he ran the "washington journal" with our two guests. >> good morning, gentlemen. >> goo
: literally all night. >> guest: a lot of good music too. >> guest: ohio yesterday, virginia today, tomorrow pennsylvania, so four battleground states. one of the things we're saying before you go to calls, one of the things we've been saying, peter, is we want these debate moderators who i respect, mr. schieffer, formerly at pbs, now retired, ms. crowley at cnn, distinguished americans who have been given responsibility to shepherd and to herd these two candidates in these debates. we want them to put poverty on the agenda. in 2008 three debates between obama and mccain -- yeah, between obama and mccain, the word poor or poverty did not come up in three debates. obama didn't raise it, mccain didn't raise it, the moderators didn't ask about it. it didn't get on the agenda four years ago. look at the situation we're in now, we can't abide another campaign season where the issue doesn't get discussed. i'm calling on my colleagues, and everywhere we go we're raising this issue, they must raise the issue of poverty starting, respectfully, at jim lehrer at the first debate october 3rd. >> host: t
, but if you want more affordable. and i want to allow us in virginia to produce oil and natural gas off our coast and use those royalties for roads and transportation. that would be the first bill i would introduce as your center. if people want a job, our approach is create more job opportunities for people. and whether it is young people are middle-aged folks, 20% of the folks in the country or underemployed or unemployed. we need to turn it around so i respectfully ask for your support, talk to your associates, friends, neighbors. let them know. if they use electricity, drive a car, want a job, or care about the future of the families they ought to join the alan t. go to our website, and most important i look forward to making sure that america is ascending once again and is a land of opportunity for all to capture their dreams. tim governor allen, thank you very much. thanks to both of you. that is going to conclude our debate today. i want to thank the fairfax chamber for hosting this debate and, of course, the governor allen, governor kaine for their participation. thank you as well t
family in virginia that had been free for generations. in fact, one of those black families had opened slaves themselves. the kerry brothers, also, while they were cutting hair, would also sell anti-slavery publications on the sly, on the side. and the hero of the book, beverly snow, was -- ran the city's finest restaurant called the epicurean eating house. he's really the hero of the book. i think of him as a barack obama, slightly ahead of him time, a very clever and intelligent mixed-race man who comes out of nowhere to conquer and charm washington, serve the washington elite what they want only to face a tremendous backlash. and i think if you read the book, you'll see some parallels to our own time there. anyway, the point is that in this book far from slavery being dominant in washington, d.c. and all-oppressive force, slavery's actually receding, and the forces of liberty are growing, and that's really part of what this book is about. the second thing you probably think is you probably think the civil war began in, oh, you know, april 1861 with the, with the gunfire at fort sumt
loss, prop 23, totally funded by the koch brothers. legislation in west virginia to overturn the new mining safety rules that were put in place after the last mind disaster. the effort to overturn mining safety regulations funded by the koch brothers. i have in the book a page with 53 different organizations. a lot of them by the way research centers on college campuses around the country all for the purpose of disputing the existence of global warming and fighting to do away with any government regulations, so anything to do with climate control. 57 organizations that i was able to find that we do partially or totally funded by the koch brothers. their reach is so great that some has called them the kochapus. they don't do it alone. twice a year with their corporate buddies from around the country and raise money for right wing political cause. two days before the book came out i was so happy this happened because i could tell people you see, i'm not exaggerating. i'm not making this up to two days before the book came out they had their latest come out in palm springs. and i'll tel
the floor. mr. manchin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from west virginia. mr. manchin: something unusual is happening in congress. democrats and republicans are agreeing on something. we appear headed toward the same goal. the problem is what we're agreeing on is more business as usual in washington. they want to pass yet another continuing resolution instead of a real budget solution. i can almost hear the people back home and all over this country saying there they go again. now, i can argue this both ways. a continuing resolution will let the government hreufrpb along again -- limp along again for another six months. that way we can go home now and come back after election to fix the budget. i haven't had anybody, madam president, in west virginia tell me that we should hurry home to campaign. i've had plenty of them tell me that we need to stay here and do the job they hired us to do. and that means fixing the budget, because our debt is piling up every day and it's choking our economy. these continuing resolutions are supposed to be temporary, but it looks to me l
. thanks. [applause] time for a couple questions if i may. the person with a virginia t-shirt and in the washington national. >> one of the characteristics i thought you might speak of at least in the phenomenal portion of your book about steve jobs was the characteristic of the focus and when he returned to apple to focus -- >> if i had to do the seven or eight lessons, simplicity is related to focus and what steve always did is i've got to filter out distractions. for example, when as you said returning to apple they were making like 40, 50 versions to milk the profit of it. he said why are we doing all of these computers? he said we have to focus and it's the home office laptop desktop that's it, for computers when they finally get the computers done right, they take that top 100 people and argue what should be the next product and biggar all of the white board to be, first page after two and a half days on the hundreds he crosses out the bottom seven and says we can only do three. we have to focus. and that's why the ipod ekimov iphone, ipad -- yes, sir. >> i wonder
] 1967 perhaps the best name case in supreme court history, loving versus virginia. what was the case? it was the case that said states could no longer than racial intermarriage. think about that. in 1967. there are people in this room who were alive in 1967. [laughter] it was still the legal and a lot of states for racial intermarriage. when barack obama's parents got married in kenya -- i'm sorry. [laughter] it is a cheap joke and i apologize but it does remind me. everybody knows mitt romney is having a rough patch as presidential candidate but a sentence i have not heard a word anywhere if only donald trump had been the nominee. because as you recall he sort of built this campaign around the idea that barack obama was born in kenya or some wherever than the united states, but the campaign did not take off and mitt romney is there for better or worse and in all seriousness when barack obama's parents got married in 1960i think it was, because it was in hawaii, that wasn't a freudian slip, that was just wrong to got married in hawaii and there were people in prison in this country f
this may be like the last supper. the fourth 1961. boarded a greyhound bus, from washington to virginia, atlanta. and arrived in a little town. left bloody. one of the same, the attack. came to my office. february 09 and said, one of the people that a tax. i want to apologize. will you forgive me? an incursion. cigarette the people there. the father start crying. i start crying. speak about reconciliation. the ability to capacity to be reconciled. move to a community. you believe in something you should speak of, speak out, stand-up and fight. yet to be consistent. you have to insist. nothing, nothing. not one thing is stronger than the truth. maybe some setbacks, may be some disappointment. the scheme of things they're going to win, you're going to succeed. the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence, the way of truth we will win out. this book is suggesting, for this in the middle east and africa, in america, any part of this planet, this little piece of real estate that we call earth, we can, as dr. king suggested, learn to live together as brothers and sisters or p
virginia primary, same two contenders, and it is almost like a stalking horse. he's kind of a stalking horse for lyndon johnson. >> what does that mean? >> and fellow who is kind of, you know, saying he is operating on his own, but really at the behest of someone else. hopefully he had wanted on his own to be president. obviously, but lyndon johnson wanted it even more. because lyndon johnson once power more than anyone ever. the lyndon johnson always wants to do it in an indirect way that is back in the cloak room sort of way, and he's going to get the nomination, that's how he go and get it. it is not enter any primaries. he enters the democrat race like a week before the convention convenes in los angeles. you know, he almost pulls back. he almost pulls it off. jack kennedy is not nominated until, what is the? until they call the roll on wyoming. >> now, there is no state that begins with z. those two primaries, jack kennedy's father doesn't want him to enter wisconsin, he thinks it is dangerous. but that is a good pick for him because it is the most heavily catholic state in the mi
. while washington took the oath of office, two states, new york and virginia were agitating for a new constitutional convention. in the words of james madison and george washington, they were terrified at this prospect. they believed it would be infiltrated by enemies of the new government and that the constitution would be scrapped and done away with in that argument would be fractured, never ever to come together again. >> you can watch this and other programs at booktv.org. more from this year's roosevelt reading festival from the franklin the roosevelt presidential library and museum. mark huddle presents his book, "founding rivals: madison vs. monroe, the bill of rights, and the election that saved a nation". >> thank you very much, good morning. i am very pleased to be here with you. i hope you will be okay with the starting off with just a little bit of a reverie about libraries it is such a pleasure to be here. roy always world war ii "roi ottley's world war ii" requires the council counsel and work of archivists around the country. for those of us who revel in archival resear
will understand where you're coming from. >> i grew up in virginia. estimate what year was that? >> 1997 before my senior year in high school. i was in iraq in 2004 and 2005. i've always been a huge reader and writer, too. when i got that from overseas i realized i had a story to tell about the war sali started writing the book. >> how long were you in the army in the armed forces? >> eight years, total. >> did you feel fulfilled? >> there was a lot i liked about. a lot of good people. i appreciated the discipline and i learned a lot about myself. >> so you are in iraq in 2003 and 2004. when you got back and left the army what was your life like? >> i think one of the things that is difficult coming back is the lack of order and direction. as difficult as it can be in the military and overseas you know what is expected of you, no matter how hard the job as, it's right there in front of you. when you get home there is so much free time that the options and possibilities and stimuli especially coming back from the desert. baffler readjustment period is challenging. >> what did you find the most chal
, war fet ralf from the university of virginia in charlottesville and this is part of book tv college series. it's about 20 minutes. joining us on booktv is professor john stagg, the author of the war of 1812, conflict for the continent university of virginia professor john stagg is it fair to say it's the second american revolutionary war a lot of people called the second war for independence. in the sense that they regarded it as a necessary sequel to the american revolution. there were certain the reasons why they thought that was the case, and the title more or less stock even in the 20th century most historians now would say american independence wasn't at stake in this war. the contemporaries had their own reason of thinking, so it is tough after the war. americans started publishing books about the war was 1816. islamic the war of 1812. estimate the war of 1812, call it the night war with great britain, one of the earliest to appear was in fact called the late war and it's a very strange and odd book to read and produces the cadences of the bible, and thus james spiked the cong
a greyhound bus and traveled from washington to virginia. we arrived in a little town called redfield, south carolina. we were attacked and beaten and left bloody. one of the same young men attacked and beat me in my seat may came to my office in february 09 and said mr. lewis, i'm one of the people that attacked and beat you. i want to apologize. we forgive me? yet been encouraging his father to seek a people he attacked. started crying, father started crying. they both gave me a hug and i started crying. this book speaks about reconciliation, the ability and capacity to be reconciled, to move towards community, that if you believe in something you should speak out, speak out. you should stand up and you should pay for it. you have to be consistent. you have to insist. nothing, nothing, not one thing is stronger than the truth. there may be some set back. there may be some disappointment . but in a long scheme of things you're going to win, you're going to succeed. the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence, the way of shrews will win out. this book is suggesting whether it's
grant lois just attack head-on throw which results in casualties with the army of virginia. for me it is a little more calculating. but you can argue back and forth and works out terrible mistakes at pearl harbor. but we always see there's antithetical. historians want to make much of the delay between them. but there's a problem, why does it grant ever fire the guy? the only grant estimated its holder to the surrender at appomattox to get their in the actual surrender ceremony, but he's quite a ways away. so we're wrapping up. it is a gentleman, thank you very much. [applause] >> your government and mind can be as powerful as the governments wanted to be. and sometimes we talk about the u.n. as it, as they distance ourselves. by doing that, they're responsible for action or inaction, an alibi secretary general. but one of my predecessors used to say that we often refer to the general as shot in doesn't stand for secretary-general. it stands for a scapegoat. so there is a scapegoat action. here's a scapegoat function of the human. but member states and the media have to be very car
in america. [applause] rde over there. rde hyperion and from the university of virginia. i noticed in a lot of my christveran friends and real apathy when it comes to political issues do you think that this courio be something that motivates the church to get back involved in politics? ing w so, htes do we articulatet in order to get some excitement? rde tha18s wus a lot of other good books. showing the scandals and how he is tpeaing this into european-svesle s idveralism and many other things is doing wrong , s dh as violating a lot of oamer loss. nobody had risen about this one. have a co author he matameres n, ng book. a lot of the research for it. i hempe it is something that ng ma and their religious people realize we have our future at stpeaer to get with ire youh now, i have seen polls that 50 percent of the evangelicals are among the nonvoters. we need in this year. could your friends to get out there and be samere they get r ameoister and vote. >> how are you keep going? at 87 yronrs oriod boou are proy more relevant and icinortant to take them when you for started incho972. how d
at the university of virginia and the national project has done a lot of work on this. i imagine that these the things you have heard are ready. so, to maximize your happiness and make sure that your future as yet only imaginary children turn out really well. you're all going to rush out and get married. obviously people don't get married for this sort of calculated reasons. even if he did decide to get engaged as soon as possible it would be a little harder in the world today than they used to be because the other side of the kind of paradox of marriage and a 21st century is that just at the time when it has become obvious that marriage is in decline. a retreat from marriage, cohabitation, kind of falling in the hills of the divorce revolution in the earlier generation. you know, people say divorce rates have stabilized, but that may be because fewer people are even attempting marriage and the first place. on the one hand this institution is great for people and on the other hand people are retreating from it. it's not just in the marriage itself that we see this crisis in relat
their lives. at the time kennedy is having lunch. he had a house in virginia called hickory hill. there is a long green lawn that slopes down. robert kennedy is sitting at a table with robert morgan who is the u.s. attorney for new york and two things happen simultaneously. i spoke to morgan. all of a sudden he saw the house being repainted. there was a guy on the ladder painting and all of a sudden hes the short wave radio transistor radio they called it then to his fear and comes, ladder and starts to run towards us as fast as he can and at that moment the telephone rings on the table on the other side of the swimming pool and ethel kennedy gets the answers and says to robert kennedy it is j. edgar hoover and it is hoover telling robert kennedy that his brother has been hit and probably killed. we know on this plane johnson went in to president kennedy's bed room and made a call to robert kennedy. he asks for details of being sworn in and the exact wording of the vote you should take as president. now you are saying is johnson taking revenge for all the humiliations that robert
from alexandria, virginia. >> what books do you think shaped america? >> i think probably young adult books. i loved -- not the list but harry potter, and things i have -- student and fahrenheit 451, and to kill a mocking -- -- mockingbird. >> do yaw have any books you haven't read yet you might be interested in reading? >> some of the classics i've always meant to read and haven't. i want to go back and take a look at them. invisible man. i don't think i ever tackled that one. >> and we are back live at the national book festival here in washington, dc. this is day one of two days of coverage. the book festival has now expanded to two days and book tv will be live both days. of you want to see our schedule go to booktv.org and we're pleased to be joined with rajiv chandrasekaran, an associate editor at the was post, and most recently the author of this book, "little america" about the war in afghanistan. but where did the term little america come from? >> it came from a remarkable project in the 1950s, led by a team of american engineers, to develop parts of southern afghanistan to d
the vote in florida, ohio and virginia, in these type of events. >> host: mary calling in on the democrats line from fort washington maryland. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. as usual i've got nothing out of what paul ryan just said because they have nothing to say. the republicans are going to do nothing like they did nothing for four years. they blocked president obama. mitch mcconnell said my main priority is to make sure president obama is a one-term president. that's not creating jobs. the way to get jobs back in this country is to cut all ties with china, as far as the trade. and things like that. what in your closet has been made in america in the last 20 years but absolutely nothing. the republicans are not going to be elected -- is obama's going to win. look at the polls. look up what the republicans have been saying. nothing, nothing, nothing. and then here we've got wars breaking out all over in the middle east. it's almost like the end days are coming, so have a nice day. >> host: a quick required to watch and engaged as we bring you live coverage of the three upcoming
of the arpa said the united states actually. but he ended up with my first job in richmond, virginia and my landlady, lambert to be, their last name was the, so we called them the grandfather of the neighborhood. they had never met in asian before. in fact, one week and they invited whole family to come see an asian. and one of the relatives is disappointed because i was not worried one of those ching dynasty cubes. when i told them i was from san francisco, they think you mean that city of san? [laughter] [applause] >> i'm so glad with so many wonderful friends at the neighborhood tonight. >> you spoke of the old-school irish americans who are here. is there anyone who is like a liaison between the old images that were that were sort of heroic? >> yes, in fact in my book said i wanted to write a history of san francisco as if dashiell hammett had written it. the opening was the carrot or vincent hallinan, the crusading lawyer who grew up in very irish catholic, you know, family, but reject did a lot of what he had grown up and and became the link to the new. he starts off assertive and nic
at the university of virginia and the national marriage project has done a lot of work on this, and i actually acknowledge that these are things you have heard already. so, to maximize your happiness and make sure that your future as yet only imaginary children turn out well, you're going to rush out and get marked for identification. right and obviously people don't get married for those calculating reasons. but even if you did decide to get engaged as soon as possible, it would be a little harter in the world today than it used to be. because the other side of the kind of paradox of marriage in the 21st century is that just at the time when it's become obvious that marriage is really good for people, marriage is in decline. wilcox talks about a retreat from marriage and a cohabitation revolution following on the heels of the divorce revolution and the earlier generation, and people say divorce rates have stabilized but that may be because fewer people are even attempting marriage in the first place. so, on the one hand we have this is great for people. oregon we have got people are retreatin
, whatever you think of douglas macarthur, and if you want to go down to -- is it -- is down in virginia, newport news, his body is down there, but if you think of macarthur, and a lot of people love macarthur and his you know been removed in he comes back to wild celebrations, but if you go to the truman library and read all the letters about when truman removed macarthur from korea you see a lot of people say how could you do this? this is one of america's war history but there's thousands of war heroes -- letter saying thank god. thank god you got rid of a guy who'd didn't have the best interest of his men at heart. his own interest was his glory in war. and, therefore, may decisions that resulted in more casualties and were not necessary. i'm not saying that macarthur's decisions were all wrong. i'm giving you a perspective on macarthur's decisions from the men who fought under him. and it was next. if eisenhower had run against macarthur for president in the '50s, who do you think would have one? eisenhower. eisenhower had a reputation for being somewhat considerate and and passive
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